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Yellowhammer

The bright yellow plumage of the adult male Yellowhammer along with his reddish-brown upper parts and white outer tail feathers easily distinguish him from all other buntings and finches that he may be compared with. The female is more sombre being duller on the back and buffish with brown flecking on the breast.

The Yellowhammer has suffered badly from changes in farming practice and where once it could be found breeding in open country and around arable farmland it is now rarely seen. The stubble fields on which it depended during the winter are now seldom found, the crop-planting regime being changed to autumn sowing leaving no fallen seed or weeds and no habitat for any insects to survive in.

Some of the most enthusiastic bird feeders amongst us maintain country feeding stations, which are supplied throughout the winter with ample amounts of ground feed for all of the finches to exploit and moderate flocks are attracted to survive any bad weather.

Haith's Premium Wild Bird Food is very attractive to this species when spread on the ground during hard weather but they will also take Prosecto Insectivorous Mix and Golden Chorus.

Consider These Bird Foods

Premium Wild Bird Food - 100% Wheat Free Bird Seed MixGreat for smaller birds
Premium Wild Bird Food - 100% Wheat Free Bird Seed Mix
(15)
Golden Chorus™Zero Waste
from £2.80
(5)
Golden Chorus™
(5)
Prosecto Insectivorous™Zero Waste
from £4.00
(4)
Prosecto Insectivorous™
(4)
Monkey Nuts in Shells
from £6.00
(2)
Monkey Nuts in Shells
(2)

The bright yellow plumage of the adult male Yellowhammer along with his reddish-brown upper parts and white outer tail feathers easily distinguish him from all other buntings and finches that he may be compared with. The female is more sombre being duller on the back and buffish with brown flecking on the breast.

The Yellowhammer has suffered badly from changes in farming practice and where once it could be found breeding in open country and around arable farmland it is now rarely seen. The stubble fields on which it depended during the winter are now seldom found, the crop-planting regime being changed to autumn sowing leaving no fallen seed or weeds and no habitat for any insects to survive in.

Some of the most enthusiastic bird feeders amongst us maintain country feeding stations, which are supplied throughout the winter with ample amounts of ground feed for all of the finches to exploit and moderate flocks are attracted to survive any bad weather.

Haith's Premium Wild Bird Food is very attractive to this species when spread on the ground during hard weather but they will also take Prosecto Insectivorous Mix and Golden Chorus.