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Lories

Besides the many partially nectivorous but predominantly seed-eating parrot-like species, there are those similar-looking birds which depend almost entirely on nectar and fruit. The Lories and Lorikeets which exist in the tropics to the east of Wallace's Line in Indonesia are dependant on fruit and nectar having adapted to this diet and having a specialised tongue and digestive system. The brush-like tip to the tongue is ideal for removing pollen and nectar from flowers and the strong pointed bill can break into the thick skin of ripening fruit. However, it should not be assumed that this is the only food taken as some take various amounts of seed and insects also.

Artificial nectars have improved the chances of survival and longevity of Lories and Lorikeets in cage and aviary conditions enormously over the last half century but this fact is not always true in their country of origin where just fruit and some seed is all that is provided.

Like all parrot-like species, they are very popular in aviculture but they require the best of care if they are to survive, thrive or even breed in captivity. Many Lories and Lorikeets are difficult to obtain as they are just not available either as captive-bred birds or imported so efforts to breed with available stock should be encouraged whenever possible.

Lories and Lorikeets are sensitive to change, especially in their diets so any variation in current feeding regime must be carried out gradually and with great care. Nectar is essential plus fruit, sunflower seed and an insectivorous mix such as Prosecto and copious amounts of greenfood, especially when young.

Many Lories and lorikeets have sticky, watery droppings resulting from their mainly wet diet, which can quickly encourage bacterial growth if not cleaned away regularly. Vanodine disinfecting liquid is most useful for this purpose.

Consider These Bird Foods

Besides the many partially nectivorous but predominantly seed-eating parrot-like species, there are those similar-looking birds which depend almost entirely on nectar and fruit. The Lories and Lorikeets which exist in the tropics to the east of Wallace's Line in Indonesia are dependant on fruit and nectar having adapted to this diet and having a specialised tongue and digestive system. The brush-like tip to the tongue is ideal for removing pollen and nectar from flowers and the strong pointed bill can break into the thick skin of ripening fruit. However, it should not be assumed that this is the only food taken as some take various amounts of seed and insects also.

Artificial nectars have improved the chances of survival and longevity of Lories and Lorikeets in cage and aviary conditions enormously over the last half century but this fact is not always true in their country of origin where just fruit and some seed is all that is provided.

Like all parrot-like species, they are very popular in aviculture but they require the best of care if they are to survive, thrive or even breed in captivity. Many Lories and Lorikeets are difficult to obtain as they are just not available either as captive-bred birds or imported so efforts to breed with available stock should be encouraged whenever possible.

Lories and Lorikeets are sensitive to change, especially in their diets so any variation in current feeding regime must be carried out gradually and with great care. Nectar is essential plus fruit, sunflower seed and an insectivorous mix such as Prosecto and copious amounts of greenfood, especially when young.

Many Lories and lorikeets have sticky, watery droppings resulting from their mainly wet diet, which can quickly encourage bacterial growth if not cleaned away regularly. Vanodine disinfecting liquid is most useful for this purpose.