For this article I’m using Haith’s Baits (new) ProChilli base mix. But before I start, let’s take a look at the options available to the home roller...

Why do boilies have to be round, the only reason I can think of is for medium/distance fishing (over 50 yards). As the baits I make and use do not catapult or go out of the throwing stick very well.
 
If fishing short day sessions then a Boilie that is hard does not let the “attractor package” out very well. The only time I use hard baits these days, is when crayfish are present or when I go on my annual French trip.
 
The Home roller can tinker with his bait to get the very best out of it, i.e. add or remove powdered attractors, like GLM (Green lipped mussel), liver powder, betaine, to make the bait heavier or lighter depending on the place that he is fishing - going from a light skinned bait to a rock hard bait...the list just goes on and on...
 
The procedure:
 
First of all, what tools are needed?


Tools
 
  • A mixing bowl
  • A fork
  • An old chip pan
 
That’s all that’s needed, really. However, rolling tables, paste guns, food mixers, burco boilers make large amounts of bait making easier. For this blog, though, I’m using a gun and tables.
 

Weigh the Base Mix

First thing I do is weigh out 1kg of base mix and add it to a minimum of 5kg bucket with a tight fitting lid. Next comes the powdered additives that are over 10gm per 500gms of base mix. These are then added to the base mix in the bucket with lid on, and given a good shake for a minimum of 5 minutes to get them well mixed in with the base mix.
 

Weigh ingredients

Next add 5 eggs to your mixing bowl and any liquids you might want to add, flavours, essential oils, "fish" oils, liquid foods.

Blending

Blend these all together with a fork.

Add low level powders

Next we return to our 5kg bucket with mixed up base mix and add a small amount of base mix to make a slurry, this is the point I add my lower level of powdered additives (like betaine) as I find they blend through the base mix better.

Time to get your hands in

Keep adding small amounts of base mix until it cannot be blended with a fork; this is the time to get your hands into the mix.

rest the paste

The finished mix wants to be firm but sticky and slightly more pliable than plastercine. Place in a freezer bag, remove as much air as you can and leave to stand for approximately 10 minutes.
 

Making Boilie Sticks

Next it’s time to knead the paste a little more... then put the paste into the gun and extrude the paste into sausages.

Pillow Cases

Now is the time to make up your mind as to what type of boilies you require; round baits are simply placed onto your rolling table and with 4 or 5 strokes of the upper table and they are done, or you can simply cut the long sausages into lengths of 3 or 4 inches and then when at the lake or river simply cut into the length that you require, alternatively place the sausages onto the rolling table and with the upper part, simply press down to create a bait that looks like a pillow case. (This type of bait is perfect for fishing on slopes or even silt as they do not roll down slops and sit on top of silt very well and in all probability you will be doing something different to almost every other angler on your water).
 
As a general rule, I boil 16 baits for 60 to 75 seconds. The idea is not to put too many types of bait into the boiling water as you will knock the water off the boil and won’t get consistent boiled bait.
 

Left over paste

When using the gun method, you will also have a small amount of paste left over. This can either be used to make cork ball popups, or, as I do, use it for a paste wrap around your hook bait.
 

Write it down

One final point I will add here is that, write your recipe down so as if you do come across a winning attractor package for your given bait you can replicate it time and time again, and also if you add something else and it does (or does not) improve the bait you can easily revert back to the original.

Carp

Carp

Brian Mills - Haith's Bait Tester.