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Learn about House Sparrows

Monday, 19th November 2018

The House Sparrow (Passer domesticus) is a member of the sparrow family Passeridae. The plumage is mostly different shades of grey and brown, the male has a brown back with black streaks and a grey crown and the female is a bit paler with a brown back.
These familiar, friendly little garden birds have an all-year-round presence which is always welcome and you can mostly find them occupying our countryside, city centres, and gardens (especially those with hedges), and they can quite often be seen squabbling and chirping - especially on pavements.
 
House Sparrow

They are known as being one of the most sociable and gregarious birds in existence and tend to live in colonies near people where they can breed and make their nests. They seem to choose crevices in buildings, creepers up buildings or holes, and will readily use a vacant nest box.

During autumn and winter, some birds will leave the large group in search of food, and when they have found it the rest of the group will follow. Their diet is diverse and includes seeds, nuts, berries, insects and often household scraps of food. House Sparrows will visit a feeding station throughout the year but will appreciate high-energy seeds and foods during colder weather.

Haith's High-Energy Extra mix will give them the boost they need and consists of oil-rich Sunflower Hearts, Black Sunflower, micro-seeds, mixed rowan and Juniper Berries to provide high-energy, for lots of garden birds. This lovely mix can be fed from a seed feeder, bird table or even scattered on the ground.

High Energy Extra

Black Sunflower

Sunflower hearts

The House Sparrow is one of the most observed garden birds in the UK and over the last few decades has been in decline. So, it is very important we play a big part in their future existence by providing food and water in our gardens, as we want to keep them coming back year after year.

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