Home > Guide > Garden Bird Feeding Guide > Raven

Raven

It is a bird that can be found in forests, mountain woods, national parks and the outskirts of towns. They are extremely versatile in finding sources of nutrition; they are omnivorous eaters and are quite happy to scrounge for food. They feed on carrion, insects, cereal grains, berries, fruit, and food waste, and would kill (if necessary) small animals (mouse size) when food is scarce.

Whatever they do to eat they will take what ever is offered on the ground or a bird table. In other words, they are not known for being fussy eaters.

If you would like to treat them to a balanced and nutritious feed try Prosecto Insectivorous. It’s a soft food, and it is blended with oils and Real Baker’s Honey and provides the high protein levels. It contains, fruit and dried flies and is a good wholesome mix, it is rich in natural calcium and low in iron – which is good news for birds who suffer from iron shortage disease.

As an alternative, try feeding live mealworms provide essential protein.

At the Tower of London a group of Ravens can be seen and according to Wikipedia they live there and their presence is traditionally believed to protect the Crown and the tower’s occupants, superstition holds that "if the Tower of London ravens are lost or fly away, the Crown will fall and Britain with it".

With Halloween just around the corner, the Raven has been associated with this historical occasion for centuries they are a bird that is portrayed as creepy; however, ravens are splendid looking birds and perhaps pay the price of unpopularity due to their size and being the largest member of the crow family.

The Raven has been around for thousands of years and will always hopefully find the means to survive. After all, the Crown and Britain are depending on it!

Consider These Bird Foods

Live MealwormsUK Live Foods
from £7.30
(8)
Live Mealworms
(8)

It is a bird that can be found in forests, mountain woods, national parks and the outskirts of towns. They are extremely versatile in finding sources of nutrition; they are omnivorous eaters and are quite happy to scrounge for food. They feed on carrion, insects, cereal grains, berries, fruit, and food waste, and would kill (if necessary) small animals (mouse size) when food is scarce.

Whatever they do to eat they will take what ever is offered on the ground or a bird table. In other words, they are not known for being fussy eaters.

If you would like to treat them to a balanced and nutritious feed try Prosecto Insectivorous. It’s a soft food, and it is blended with oils and Real Baker’s Honey and provides the high protein levels. It contains, fruit and dried flies and is a good wholesome mix, it is rich in natural calcium and low in iron – which is good news for birds who suffer from iron shortage disease.

As an alternative, try feeding live mealworms provide essential protein.

At the Tower of London a group of Ravens can be seen and according to Wikipedia they live there and their presence is traditionally believed to protect the Crown and the tower’s occupants, superstition holds that "if the Tower of London ravens are lost or fly away, the Crown will fall and Britain with it".

With Halloween just around the corner, the Raven has been associated with this historical occasion for centuries they are a bird that is portrayed as creepy; however, ravens are splendid looking birds and perhaps pay the price of unpopularity due to their size and being the largest member of the crow family.

The Raven has been around for thousands of years and will always hopefully find the means to survive. After all, the Crown and Britain are depending on it!