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The Robin

Tuesday, 15th August 2017

The Robin is a common favourite with most people and one of the easiest to recognise.

Red Robin
 
The Robin (Erithacus rubecula), is a small insectivorous passerine bird and is one of the UK’s favourites, it is simply known as the robin or robin red breast (due to the colour of its breast being bright red) the upperparts are brown, the belly is whitish and the face is lined with grey and both female and male are almost identical. In the winter, they are joined by migrants from Scandinavia and other parts of Europe which are slightly paler than our own.

The Robin has a melodious tone and can be heard all year round; their confident song is a delight to hear but can actually be a warning to other birds not to stray into their territory. Despite their cute Christmas card appearance, they are ferociously territorial and are very quick to drive away other robins.

They can be seen across the UK in woodlands, hedgerows, parks and gardens, and feed mainly on insects, worms and appreciate a good quality bird seed mix. Live mealworms are a firm favourite and the robin being one of the tamest wild birds can be easily trained to take food from an outstretched hand.

They are known for having a ‘sweet tooth’ and often take uncooked pastry and cake especially fruit cake, so if you have any leftovers these make a lovely treat on the bird table.

Berry Suet Pellet ExtraSPACERSunflower Hearts

Haith’s Fat Robin soft food is nutritious and is blended together with high-energy berry flavoured suet pellets and ever-popular sunflower hearts plus vegetable oils and raisins. It will be taken eagerly from a bird table, softfood feeder, or when lightly sprinkled on the ground - the robins love it!

Softfood Feeders
 
Please share any photos you take of ‘your’ robin with us on Facebook or email them to enquiries@haiths.com

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