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Home > Haith's PRO Blog > "Half of world's animals have disappeared since 1970" - the Telegraph

"Half of world's animals have disappeared since 1970" - the Telegraph

Friday, 17th October 2014

Look out of your office window, travel the globe – take a walk through one of a number of ever-dwindling ancient forests, paddle in a village stream or splash around in the sea - what do you see and hear?

If you could take the same walk, the same journey, over 40 years ago you’d see and hear around twice the number of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish than you would today.

Why?

Because a shocking report from the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) has found that 52 per cent of the world's animals have vanished in 40 years.

According to The World Wildlife Fund (WWF), “Almost the entire decline is down to human activity, through habitat loss, deforestation, climate change, over-fishing and hunting.”

David Nussbaum, chief executive of the WWF in the UK said: "The scale of destruction highlighted in this report should be a wake-up call to us all. We all, politicians, businesses and people, have an interest, and a responsibility, to act to ensure we protect what we all value: a healthy future for both people and nature."

We’ll (Haith’s) be giving our support to BIAZA this year and highlighting the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (the IUCN have been guiding conservation over 50 years) by taking part in Red November. You can find out more about IUCN athttp://www.iucnredlist.org/

And if you are wondering why we've used a Starling to illustrate this post, you might be suprised to read that the once abundent Starling now has Red Status.

Read more about this story via the Telegraph:http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/wildlife/11129163/Half-of-worlds-animals-have-disappeared-since-1970.html
 

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